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Sky Viewing for Beginning of 2021


PLANETS

According to Yahoo, "Just before sunrise on Jan.11, face southeast and just above the horizon you will see a slim crescent moon to the right of dazzling Venus.

Venus will then slowly make its way behind the sun and become invisible for several months. It will pop out in the evening sky at the end of May and blaze as the brightest star-like object all summer and fall.


January 20 and 21, it will be Mars’s turn. The first quarter moon will pass by the red planet on each of those nights. Our two largest planets get a guest in the morning sky when the moon cozies up to Saturn on April 6 and Jupiter on April 7.


Mercury, always a difficult planet to find since it rarely strays far from the sun’s glare, will make its best appearance just after sunset in May. Mercury-viewing season begins May 13 when it will be next to the moon and end May 28 after a close conjunction with Venus.


On July 11 just after sunset, Mars, Venus and the crescent moon will line up. And on July 12 and 13, the planets of love and war will be only about a half degree apart. In fact you may be able to see both planets at the same time through a small telescope."


MOON

Also look for 3 "Super" Moons next year. According to SeaSky.org,


"April 27 - Supermoon The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 10 pm EST. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Pink Moon because it marked the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the first spring flowers. This moon has also been known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Growing Moon, and the Egg Moon. Many coastal tribes called it the Fish Moon because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn. The Moon will be near its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.


May 26 - Supermoon The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 6:14 EST. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance. This moon has also been known as the Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.


June 24 - Supermoon The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 1:40 pm EST. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Strawberry Moon because it signaled the time of year to gather ripening fruit. It also coincides with the peak of the strawberry harvesting season. This moon has also been known as the Rose Moon and the Honey Moon."


With a "Blue" Moon occurring on August 22. SeaSky.org explains,"The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated. This phase occurs at 7:02 am EST. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Sturgeon Moon because the large sturgeon fish of the Great Lakes and other major lakes were more easily caught at this time of year. This moon has also been known as the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon. Since this is the third of four full moons in this season, it is known as a blue moon. This rare calendar event only happens once every few years, giving rise to the term, “once in a blue moon.” There are normally only three full moons in each season of the year. But since full moons occur every 29.53 days, occasionally a season will contain 4 full moons. The extra full moon of the season is known as a blue moon. Blue moons occur on average once every 2.7 years."



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